18th century up close

It’s not everyday that one is fortunate enough to handle an 18th century robe a la francaise. While dressing for the upcoming Timeline exhibit I snapped a couple of details to share. None of the expensive silk faille went to waste. The widths of fabric making up the skirt and petticoat were stitched using the selvedges as seam allowance. In the picture below you can catch a glimpse of the pink and blue stripes of the selvedge peeking out behind the small hand stitches.

Image

Just wait until you see the entire dress.  It’s in the photo studio right now so be sure to check in tomorrow!

Joanne Arnett, Curatorial Assistant

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5 responses to “18th century up close

  1. jean-marc lafond

    how many stitches to the inch does this represent? There is nothing to identify the scale.

  2. Hello Jean-Marc,
    The seams on the petticoat and the skirt of the robe, like the one pictured above, average around 8 stitches per inch.

  3. Thank you for this post! Visual stitch documentation, like fabric documentation, is rare and wonderful. If you all have a chance and interest, we’d love to know more!

  4. What a great website this one. Hopefully one day I’ll visit the museum.
    May I ask where did you source this gorgeous silk faille fabric? I’ve been searching for something similar for ages!

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